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helenrose
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wetwood

Postby helenrose » Sat January 6th, 2007, 11:40 am

Hello everyone, i have a e24, on my foredeck next to the port fairlead i have what looks like a small scar caused by a rope chaffing i presume, it has cut through the cacover? layer and water has saturated about a six inch square of the ply, i have covered the area and let it dry out for the last two weeks but an area just inboard the fairlead is very spongey. The rest of the foredeck is sound.What i would like to know is the most cost effective way to repair this area. thanks in advance for any advice given.


chris. "rose"

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Fiddler's Green
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soft wood

Postby Fiddler's Green » Sat January 13th, 2007, 10:44 pm

The only way to treat soft wood is to cut it out!

If there is just wet wood it might dry out and then you could soak it in 'Git Rot' or a similar wood treatment.

However to be sure there are no freshwater (rain) borne spores of wood rot, I wouyld cut it out.

Be ruthless. remove all deck fittings nearby, hammer and poke till you find solid wood, then cut 3 to 4 inches beyond it. Next look to where you can best join the new ply to the old. It could be you then cut a further 9 inches to get the best place to join!

NOT ON A BEAM!!!!

Cut to midway between the next beam and the last. Then join the ply to the new by fitting a 6" wide butt strap under it. If across the deck you could make this but strap fill the space between the two beams. That way it will be difficult to see the repair from below and offer the best glueing and screwing surface. Either use small screws or better copper nails and roves to form a rivetted join. However with modern epoxy you will not need to go to these lengths, just clamping with epoxy will be stronger than the old way!

You will have to join the deck down the centre maybe with butt straps and the edge will have to be refastened down to the main carlin. Once a layer of epoxy and glass mat is laid on top and you have sanded it down, you will not be aware of the repair!

All sounds a bit daunting I guess, but cutting the bad out is the worst part. Those who do not, have to do far more a year or two later, or see their cherished boat rot away....

A little soon is better!

hope this helps, I have been there too! My old E24 Blunose had to have a new stern deck!

Regards,
John
Proud owner and builder of 'Fiddler's Green'

helenrose
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Joined: Tue October 31st, 2006, 2:25 pm
Location: uk

wetwood

Postby helenrose » Wed January 17th, 2007, 6:23 pm

Thanks john soon as the weather britens up i'll give it a go,by the way what do you think of a lister 11.2hp twin air cooled as an inboard? i know they are noisy and probely smelly, but so what. i'll be glad of your opinion.

good sailing, chris.

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Fiddler's Green
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Motor

Postby Fiddler's Green » Wed January 17th, 2007, 8:56 pm

Sounds like a good power unit, albeit a little on the heavy side maybe?

I had a Stuart Turner 8 in my old E24, weighed in at 240lbs!

I had the slightly bigger 10 hp Stuart in my E26 (27) weighed the same, replaced it with a diesel, 3 cylinder Kubuto, weighed slightly less. 200lb roughly. How much does the Lister weigh?

Should not be smelly if it does not leak, you have the advantage with an air cooled motor of being able to divert the cooling air into the cockpit for cold days! Certainly will not want it to be smelly if you do that. Air cooled motors are noisier than watercooled, as there is no water jacket to stop some of the moise, however with good sound proofing you can manage the noise.. the Air ducting does take up a bit of space though and the exhaust is often red hot as it has no water injected... wire cages to stop your ropes melting in the stern locker....

Hope this helps,

John
Proud owner and builder of 'Fiddler's Green'

helenrose
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wetwood

Postby helenrose » Fri January 19th, 2007, 12:49 pm

Hello john,
thanks for the reply concerning replacing wood on my foredeck, one question, why dont you reccomend cutting back to a beam, it would save putting in a but strap.
regards chris.

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Decks

Postby Eventide Owners Group » Mon January 22nd, 2007, 10:59 am

Hi Chris,

if you cut back to a beam the most beam width you might get would be 2" if you are lucky.

This means the edge of the ply sheet will only be on that beam by less than 1". In that 1" or less you have to secure it, with screws that are neither near the edge of the beam nor the edge of the ply, difficult. Not a lot of room here!! Add to that if there is any curvature across the joint you will get a 'kink' in the ply. (If is done on the sides of a vessel it gives the 'hungry greyhound' look.)

On the deck it will just annoy you forever as you always see it and just know it will be the place water will get in again, as it WILL crack!

No if the job is worth doing, it is better to do it well, then you will neither regret it nor have to re do it in 5 years time!

It is actually easer to do once you get your head round it!

Hope this helps,

John
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helenrose
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Joined: Tue October 31st, 2006, 2:25 pm
Location: uk

Postby helenrose » Mon January 22nd, 2007, 6:27 pm

That makes sense, thanks once again john.

chris.


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