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mikey
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Postby mikey » Thu August 31st, 2006, 7:32 pm

I have just aquired plans for the senior and have been perusing them. if i decide to build it, I was wondering if it was necessary to use mahogany for the keel and hog as I would be sheathing the hull in glass fibre. Are there any cheaper alternatives that are strong enough?

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Postby Eventide Owners Group » Sun September 3rd, 2006, 1:21 pm

Hello there,

today I would recommend Iroko for all the structural parts of your boat.

It is plantation grown and will out last all the normal Mahogony's etc.

You could get away with building in softwood, but you open yourself up to a boat rotting away under you in less than 10 years!

Epoxy encapsulation might be a way of making it last longer, but if water gets in, it will rot fast.

If you only want to build the boat once, then use it for years and it to have a good resale value on the day you decide to move up to the golden hind, then use Iroko! ( or anothe timber very similar, Teak, maybe, Afromosia or one of the durable timbers of that ilk.)

hope this helps,

Regards,
john
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Len
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Location: Kösching, Germany

Timber for SENIOR

Postby Len » Sat September 30th, 2006, 2:29 pm

[quote="Eventide Owners Group"]Hello there,

today I would recommend Iroko for all the structural parts of your boat.

It is plantation grown and will out last all the normal Mahogony's etc.

You could get away with building in softwood, but you open yourself up to a boat rotting away under you in less than 10 years!

Epoxy encapsulation might be a way of making it last longer, but if water gets in, it will rot fast.

If you only want to build the boat once, then use it for years and it to have a good resale value on the day you decide to move up to the golden hind, then use Iroko! ( or anothe timber very similar, Teak, maybe, Afromosia or one of the durable timbers of that ilk.)

hope this helps,

Regards,
john
Eventiders[/quote][quote][u]


I am also considering building a SENIOR. Here in darkest Bavaria, a long way from the sea, suitable timber is VERY difficult to find. I have located a wholesaler who has planks of what he calls SIPPO. Probably sapele, very dark red. The planks are 35 mm thick about 30 t0 50 cm widr and 5 to 6 m long, not a knot in sight, and expensive ca. 1350 Euro / cubic m. I would have to buy a complete plank. Enough for several seniors !!

Would you consider this a suitable timber for the major structural parts ?

Regards Len
[/b][/u][/quote]
Leonard_Woods

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suitable timbers?

Postby Eventide Owners Group » Sat September 30th, 2006, 7:05 pm

Hi Len,

I have just had a look at our 'Owners Tips' page, 'Timber for Boatbuilding'

Seems Sapele is only moderately durable, so will survive 10 to 15 years if buried bare in the garden! Sounds as if you might be OK with that, you will no doubt treat it with rot proofing before you paint or maybe even epoxy it, should be OK for a few years!

Like so many of these timbers there are many types of Sapele, so the heavier and denser the better I suspect!

Hope it helps

Regards,
John
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Len
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Joined: Wed September 27th, 2006, 1:06 pm
Location: Kösching, Germany

Postby Len » Wed April 11th, 2007, 9:03 am

Hi Eventiders,
After a long pause, I would like to add to the question of suitable timber sorts. Above, I asked about a wood I called Sippo (German name). I have since founf out that it should be Sipo, in spite of the short 'i' and it is not Sapelli. In England it is called Utile.

What do you think if using Utile ?

The whole question of names of plants and trees ( and animals) in different languages is loaded with difficulties. Even different parts of the same country use different names for the same tree. Also, In my several books on boatbuilding and design, there are lists of 'suitable' timber sorts. Only in very few cases have I been able to identify the same sort in more than one list. You might amost think they were compiled on separate planets, with totally different botanik. At least they are the result of each author's experience and prejudice.
However, help is at hand. I have found an excelent book on the subject. Mine is a German translation of an English original called

"The Encyclopedia of Wood" by Aidan Walker, New Burlington Books.

This lists 150 sorts of useful wood sorts with their latin names and, most important, a host of alternative local names. Plus pictures of finished timber and some properties.

Regards, Len.
Leonard_Woods

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boat building timbers....

Postby Eventide Owners Group » Wed April 11th, 2007, 12:40 pm

Utile is not one I see recommended for boatbuilding, as it is only moderatley durable.

You really have to be looking at the Iroko and similar if you want your creation to last a lifetime.

With lesser timbers and careful treatment, preservative, Epoxy and the like you can achieve good results, but it does take a lot more work.

I have seen boats built of softwood. Fine for a fortnight, but after 10years they are scrap.
Others built from lesser grades of hardwood fail after 15 years if water gets in to them... is it worth it?

I just think to myself, all that effort into making the boat, why not make it to last, long enough for the grandchildren to sail it, and beyond!

Regards,
John
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